Archive: future

July 30th, 2014 | By Glen Hiemstra | Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

3D Printing Future Looks Promising

Shapeways is a company bringing 3D printing to the masses. I am curious as to how large an impact 3D printing will really have on manufacturing, and how soon. Recently, spending some time teaching strategic thinking to Saint Gobain, a couple of manufacturing researchers in the class confirmed for me that they are using 3D printing more and more and in fact expect it to become faster, and more widely used than I had suspected.

Imagine a world where many products are manufactured on demand, in the local equivalent of a Kinkos copy store. Imagine the ability to tweak the design yourself, if you want, before you hit the print button. This future may be coming sooner than we think.

Continue Reading & Comment »

July 24th, 2014 | By Glen Hiemstra | Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Immigration is not overwhelming the future

During recent visits to various parts of the U.S., in casual conversation with people I am asked what I think should be done about the “tidal wave” of illegal immigration allegedly going on. When I point out that the problem is not nearly so bad now as it once was, people literally take a step back and look at me like I am crazy, so thorough is the news propaganda that hypes this issue endlessly.

It is an issue that matters to me, as a child of immigrant grandparents and mother. We ourselves are not that long in this country, and I grew up on stories of what it was like for my mother’s family to sail into New York and to pass by the Statue of Liberty with its famous but now nearly forgotten welcoming words:

Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!

Instead we have the quite embarrassing scene of hoards of “patriots” standing at the border protesting the entry of 60,000 – 60,000!! — children and young people who are refugees seeking to escape violence and poverty in their home countries. Americans should be, and used to be, much better than that.

As for the real truth about immigration the recent stats are these…

While the number of unaccompanied youth crossing the border has doubled to nearly 60,000 in the past year, the total number of undocumented immigrants has mostly declined. About 1 million people have been caught crossing the border nearly every year between 1983 until 2006, but that number has dropped to about 400,000 in 2013.

The future will undoubtedly involve people moving around the world. We had better figure out how to deal with it in an intelligent way.

Continue Reading & Comment »

July 22nd, 2014 | By Glen Hiemstra | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Drivers Wanted – Will Teens Really Disdain Cars Forever?

For several years I have been following the trend away from an auto-centered culture. This trend is reflected in fewer miles driven and even more dramatically in the declining interest of teens and young people in driving or owning a car at all. This trend is dramatic, and has been sustained now for several years, indicating that it may be a true emerging trend that will stick.

Mustang2015Here are some of the more recent numbers. The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute found that the number of American teens getting their license is dropping fast. Between 1982 and 2010 the number of 17-year-olds who got a driver’s license fell from 69 percent to 46 percent. For 18-year-olds the numbers declined from 70 percent to 54 percent.

It was not that long ago that teens dreamed of their first car, and certainly their driver’s license, and their ticket to freedom and to social mobility. No longer. Teens now see a car not only as unaffordable due to cost and insurance, but as more of an albatross than a means of breaking free.

Older people are quick to assume that high costs and a bad economy are the reason that teens and young people no longer covet cars, or even suggest that today’s teens are too lazy to drive. But they have this quite wrong. There is a profound cultural and technological shift underway in which driving is seen at best as a nuisance and something to be avoided. Young people are more likely to see driving as an interruption of their lives than a means to live. I expect this trend to deepen, until the car companies become truly alarmed. There is evidence they are already concerned, mostly in the way that advertising has skewed almost completely toward trying to convince young people, even children, that cars are cool and that they should want one. I do not think it will work.

Continue Reading & Comment »

April 21st, 2014 | By Glen Hiemstra | Posted in Ecosystems, Environment & Energy, Innovation, Millennial City | Comments Off

The Future of Roadways is Solar, and Brilliant

We’ve been tracking the progress of Scott and Julie Brusaw of Sandpoint Idaho and their federally supported project to build a prototype for a smart highway that generates power and pays for itself. This is Solar Roadways. We’ve chatted from time to time and I show videos of the project in many of my programs (people love it and are amazed at the audacious idea). This is a project worth supporting. The are launching an Indiegogo campaign on Earth Day, 22 April 2014.

We share their press release below with a photo of the prototype parking lot recently completed. They modestly call it an “intelligent” highway system – but I’d call a road that pays for itself, heals itself, generates solar energy, has built in lighting, and heating that prevents ice and snow buildup, and is made of glass… brilliant!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 14, 2014
SOLAR ROADWAYS RELEASES FIRST PHOTOS OF SOLAR PARKING LOT PROTOTYPE
Announces crowdsource campaign to launch on Earth Day
SOLAR ROADWAYS, SAGLE, IDAHO (APRIL 14, 2014)

Parking lot east

Solar Roadways was tasked by the Federal Highway Administration, with a Phase II SBIR contract, to build a solar parking lot prototype. The first photos of the initial installation have been released. “The basic installation is now done, but there is still work to do before the parking lot will be totally complete- LED patterns, covers for mounting holes and mastic to fill the gaps between panels are still to come”, said Scott Brusaw, co-founder, along with his wife Julie of Solar Roadways, Inc.

“One of the biggest challenges of this phase was to explore and test various glass surfaces and textures and test them for strength, traction and durability and all test results have exceeded our expectations. In addition to the solar cells, the panels contain heaters to keep them snow/ice free and LED lights for road lines and verbiage” , said Scott Brusaw.

The company needs to acquire funding to begin hiring a team, streamline the process for quick and cost effective production, and gear up for manufacturing. To this end, Solar Roadways will launch an Indiegogo campaign at 12:01am EST on Earth Day, April 22, 2014.

The Brusaws plan to locate their first manufacturing facility near their home in north Idaho, but envision facilities in most states and various countries as production ramps up. Solar Roadways has already received an outpouring of interest from potential customers, from their home town of Sandpoint, Idaho to remote areas of the world.

Solar Roadways is a company with a single purpose: to replace our nation’s deteriorating highway infrastructure and crumbling power grid with an intelligent highway system that pays for itself through the generation of electricity and doubles as an intelligent, self-healing, decentralized power grid.

Roadway image

Contact
Scott and Julie Brusaw
(208) 263-2537
julie@solarroadways.com

Continue Reading & Comment »

April 18th, 2014 | By Glen Hiemstra | Posted in Innovation, Science & Tech | Comments Off

The Future of Mobility – Podcast

Check out my latest chat with Dave Evans, Chief Futurist at Cisco, on the future of mobility wearable technology, and the internet of everything. Listen to the podcast here.

Nuubo shirt with cardiac monitor

Nuubo shirt with cardiac monitor

I think we are in the process of building the greatest engineering project in history. Cisco calls it the “Internet of everything,” Verizon calls it “M2M for machine-to-machine communication,” and IBM, of course, has called it a “smarter planet” for some time now. At one time the build out of the Internet and wireless networks could be seen as our greatest engineering feat, aimed at connecting over 7 billion people with each other on demand. We are almost there. But the new project is bigger because it involves building a global platform for devices to communicate with each other and thus to integrate the human, natural and built worlds. One estimate is that some 25 billion devices will be connected and communicating by 2015, 50 billion by 2020, leading to as much as $14 trillion in economic activity in the next decade. By any measure these are huge numbers.

The future of mobility is intimately tied to this engineering project – as our devices come to know where they are, and more importantly become able to communicate information to other devices and to us, the world will change quite fundamentally. We’ve become familiar with various quantified self health devices like wrist bands that count your steps and activity, or monitor your sleep patterns, and then provide feedback. Apps now enable those devices to link with others in a group you might create, so everyone can monitor the progress of others and of course make comparisons and turn fitness into more of a game.

But were we are headed, and credit Dave for this language, is from wearable devices to aware-able devices. Right now with the fitness band I use I have to set up a group, with their agreement of course, and then we can compare. In future, the band, the Nuubo running shirt with built in monitors or other devices I might wear will link to big data via the cloud and I will know, for example, how my week compares to all other men in my age range nationally or globally. The device will become more aware, in other words.

One of my favorite smart devices I came across recently is a smart helmet insert from Shockbox. Concussions are a problem in contact sports. With an insert that measures the force of blows to the head, and communicates wirelessly to a handheld device, a coach or team doctor on the sideline can track the blows being received. So when a young player staggers off the field but says “I’m fine” the data will be right there saying, no you received too hard a blow.

Shockbox sensor with iPhone

Shockbox sensor with iPhone

Here is the podcast again. Dave thinks we are going to move in stages from smart wearables to smart implantables to possibly even the choice of enhanced replacement parts for bodies. Provocative stuff. Among other things I describe an interesting traffic incident and wonder why we still rely on human brains and hand-eye coordination in split second situations. With smart infrastructure, devices, and mobility, we won’t.

Continue Reading & Comment »

Page 1 of 4912345...102030...Last »